Animals Drawings – Ducks & Cockerels

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‘Contre Nous… La Tyrannie’ A5. Sanguine.

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‘Don’t Mess with Me’ A4. Mixed Drawing Medii

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‘Double Duck’ 30 x 30 cm. Mixed Drawing Medii.

 

 

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‘Wanted #1’ 30 x 30 cm. Sanguine.

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‘Wanted #2’ 30 x30 cm. Sanguine.

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‘Wanted #3’ 30 x 30 cm. Sanguine.

As a spiritual person, nature for me has always been a healing place. Going back all the way to my childhood on the farm, the fields and forests were places of adventure and self-discovery. Animals were companions and friends, and the world moved at a slower, more rational pace than the bustling cities where I’d resided my adult life. – David Mixner
Cows 5 graphite A5

Cows 5 graphite A5

my drawings of my neighbours’ cows in the  field opposite – drawing studies from life

 

on the hoof 😉 get the joke? if u don’t then u shpould know that colloquial (en-gb) ‘on the hoof’ means on the trot, on the move, improvised, ‘sur la vif’ (fr) … ie gesture drawings of moving objects.

 

Cows 6 graphite A5
Cows 6
graphite
A5

Cows by Reubens

Look at this amazing study of cows by Rubens. Not surprising that Rubens was drawn to cows. Observe how in the two cows in the bottom corner how he studies their bone structure. From flesh (top three) to bone (bottom two). Mind you, cows in the seventeenth century were probably more boney than modern day cows, with steroids & genetically modofied cattle feed.Observe how Rubens is trying to understand anatomny, really looking. He wouldn’t have had any photographs to copy back in the studio by had to rely on the information harvested from this drawing. There is a great difference when you just copy a photograph as opposed to when you understand the structure, the anatomny of something.

Rubens Drawing of Cows, British Museum

Rubens
Drawing of Cows, British Museum

I’m hoping to teach life drawing classes this autumn/ winter here in the Dordogne. Contact me if interested. (Nude humans not nude cows ;-).

Good Friend

‘Berty’
graphite
A5 sketchbook
© The Artist.

My mum’s Jack Russell is not well. Might not make it. He is a great friend. These animal friends in our lives. Please note, this skeych is from before his illness.

On the Hoof 4

‘On the Hoof 4’
conté
A3
© The Artist.

Drawing of a Calf Suckling

‘On the Hoof 3’

conté pastel on paper
about the size of my hand
© The Artist.

Spring time here in the Dordogne. The veal calves are in the field. In a few weeks time, they’ll be gambolling & careering about.

I can’t believe I’ve got the relative sizes of mother & off-spring right……comme même!

Drawing of a Bull’s Head in Profile

‘On the Hoof 2’
conté pastel on paper
about the size of my hand
© The Artist.

Drawing of a Bull’s Head in Profile

The name of this bull was ‘Pom Pom’
I’ve not drawn cows before. I found it strange how my hand didn’t know where to start & how to go about it. When I draw a tree or a face, my hand knows. Maybe it’s familarity? Repetition can blind. I sometimes dream about drawing trees, see them unfolding on the page in my sleep.I enjoyed this unfamilarity. This strangeness. This slight panic. I guess the beginning level students that I teach feel this way too. About everything…. Even the conté pastel in their hand. Even the paper’s pores & fibres.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m no stranger to cows. I live right besides two herds!

 

Tips for developing one’s Drawing Style

If I were always just to repeat & not try new subject matter, new materials, new approaches & even new ideas… what type of artist would I be? A one trick horse… Anyway, I am drawn to diversity & experimentation. The question now is , what remains constant?

I live drawing, put simply. Try to draw soemthing new & out of one’s orbit every now & then. I enjoy being thus stretched.

On the Hoof 1

‘On the Hoof 1’
pencil & ink
A5 sketchbook
© The Artist.

Drawing of a Cow & her  calf  lying down

 

first of  a series of bovines…look further in this blog to follow the herd

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