La Dordogne à Lalinde 1

‘La Dordogne à Lalinde 1’
Medium Size Oil on canvas
65 x 54 cm
© adam cope
The same little islands – ‘îlots’ en francais – as in these paintings down from the opposite bank.

‘ Îlots, Pontours 1’
Medium size oil on canvas
46 x 38 cm
© adam cope

‘ Îlots, Pontours 2’
Medium size oil on canvas
70 x 33 cm
© adam cope

La Dordogne à Beynac 2

‘La Dordogne à Beynac 2’
Aquarelle
28 x 38 xm (approx 11 x 15 “).
© adam cope

number two of two paintings

see painting number one

“the light’s changed…”

 

 

La Dordogne à Beynac 1

Aquarelle
28 x 38 cm – approx 15 x 11″
© dam that cope
number one of two paintings
late afternoon light, pale winter, white glinting reflections on the black river

This is the 500th post on this blog (489 published, 11 drafts not yet published).

postcriptum 2013 – been editting down the blog, so this is one will no longer  number 500

Many thanks for your following. Your comments are an encouragement to me 🙂

Just blogging away… Just keep on keeping on… Just painting away 🙂

What else would I do with my hours? Hmmm, well… I really must finish off & publish my ‘How to Paint’ book.

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Recently finished this re-working of a large oil which I had had my doubts about. It is now fully realised, or at least arrived at a stage where I can abandon it & move on… It hung about in storage since 2003 till I could make my mind up about it. Here is the finished painting:

 

la vallee de begerac depuis monbazillac - oil painting by adam cope

 

‘La Vallée de Bergerac depuis Monbazillac’
Oil on Canvas
81 x 65 cm (approx 32 x 28 inches)
© Adam Cope

Another large oil of the same view dating from the same period :

contemporay painting of vines by adam cope

‘Dionysus’s Patch’

Oil. 85 x 80 cm © SOLD

 
‘Telly Fans 10’  by adam cope – sanguine
 

 
‘Telly Fans 8’  by adam cope – graphite

Intimate Portraits by Artist’s of Their Own Children

I overheard on the web some artists saying that they couldn’t possibly do portraits of their own kids as it was ‘too close.’  I don’t agree. Neither did a lot of artists much more well know & much more further on down the artist’s path than I. Be they Mums or be they Dads. Often that extra intimacy with the model makes for a magic that isn’t found in more run of the mill portraits. Watching one’s own children is one of the treasures of parenting.

Take Augustus John’s portraits of his children for example.  Here’s one of his son Robin (1912). A real boy if ever there was. Glaring firely out of the painting, obiviously not far-off from a tantrum:

 

Another favourite of mine are Matisse’s portraits of his son Pauln (done from memory I seem to remember):

 

Cézanne’s son Paul (how did he get him to sit so so so very still for so so long?):

 

Then there’s Gainsbourgh’s two daughters ( When I was a little boy, I used to stand before this in the National gallery London with my Granny & laugh. A cabbage white, two sisters & a smile & a little hand reaching out) :

 

Rembrandt’s kids… maybe this is a scene from family life :

 

More on Rembrandt’s Drawings of Children – Anticipation & Action and Rembrandt’s Gesture Drawing

 

Gabrielle de St.Aubin :

 

Chardin (wisely skiving off his home-work):

 

Renoir (very diligent boy this):

 

Picasso , of course….many many times over! In some ways, I’m now refinding the greatness of Picasso via his images of his own children… it’s all there : love, play, intimacy, likenesses (consistant over a series & different styles), talent of course… fireworks of course… fun ,as you’d expect from kids 🙂 Here is an image that sings of eternity, of why we parents love our children 🙂 I really didn’t realise that Picasso had done quiet so many paintings of each child, with no thought for commercialism, voyeuristic onlookers,  etc:

 
 
 
 

Maurice Denis, Augustin Rouard et Lucien Jonas.

 

I could go on with this list…

And what about all the old paintings of kids …Do we know if they are the children of the artist or somebody else”q children? Some of the Quattrocento drawings of kids are astounding!

Lastly, here’s  a personal favourite of mine : Winifred Nicholson’s painting of her own two kids.

 

The last word to Kathleen Raine on Winifred Nicholson, (who lived not far from where I trained at Newcastle University UK art school at the same time …I wish I met her!)

… to be with Winifred was to be with a totally committed artist, for whom each day shed its light on a new theme for a painting. The ever-changing light of the seasons, the flowers, the weather, the arrivals and departures of children and grand-children, all these gave her what she called the ‘stories’ of her paintings in which she captured the day, the hour, and ever-fleeting present.  –   Kathleen Raine, quoted by Alice Strang, Winifred Nicholson, National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, 2003

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A stray thought crosses my mind about actors/actresses & their off-spring, especially those that become actors/actresses in their turn.

‘e, the artist’s daughter’ by adam cope, sanguine.

 

related posts:

Drawing of Mother & Child – attachment theory – Bed Time Story 9

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